Hedge Sparrows

Hedge Sparrows

You don’t see many hedges these days, and the hedges you do see they’re not that thorny, it’s a shame, and when I say a hedge I’m not talking about a row of twigs between two lines of rusty barbed wire, or more likely just a big prairie where there were whole cities of hedges not fifty years ago, a big desert more like, and I mean thick hedges, with trees nearby for a bit of shade and a field not a road not too far off so you can nip out for an insect or two when you or the youngsters feel like a snack, a whole hedgerow system, as it says in the book, and seven out of ten sparrows say the same, and that’s an underestimate, we want a place you can feel safe in again, we’re social animals, we want our social life back, and the sooner the better, because in a good hedge you can always talk things over, make decisions, have a laugh if you want to, sing, even with a voice like mine!

Richard Price

from Lucky Day (Manchester: Carcanet, 2005)

Reproduced by kind permission of the author and publisher.
Richard Price

Richard Price is increasingly recognized as one of the more important voices of his generation, a poet who moves comfortably between the lyrical and the avant-garde. His collection Lucky Day was shortlisted for the Whitbread Poetry Prize, and he was an influential figure in a literary movement which he named: Informationist poetry. In addition to his award-winning poetry, he has collaborated with sculptors, digital artists, and musicians.

Read more about this poet
About Hedge Sparrows

This poem, representing Great Britain, is part of The Written World – our collaboration with BBC radio to broadcast a poem from every single nation competing in London 2012.

This poem, representing Great Britain, is part of The Written World – our collaboration with BBC radio to broadcast a poem from every single nation competing in London 2012.